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Dan’s Roadmap on How to Pass the Bar Exam: The Final Few Days Before the Test

I’m sure the past two months of studying for the Bar Exam have been grueling, if not punishing for you all. Looking out the window at Starbucks while reading a BarBri outline on Contracts as others stroll by in shorts and flip-flops on their way to a summer’s day of fun and frivolity can make you want to scream, “I have had enough of this. Let’s just get it over … read more →


Coping with Summertime Depression: The Light of Gratitude

July’s heat and the sun have made it pretty hot. It’s steamy outside. But that’s just fine with me.  My feet aren’t cold, dark clouds don’t threaten snow, and everyone’s outside watering yards, humming a tune, and going for walks at night. As we look over the horizon, August is almost here. Author Natalie Babbitt captures some of the summer’s magic when she writes: “The first week of August hangs … read more →


My New Book On Depression and Anxiety in the Law and How a Lawyer Life Coach Can Help

I’ve written a new book about depression and anxiety in the legal profession. And it’s free. You can get an immediate, free download of “Overcoming Stress, Burnout, Anxiety, and Depression in the Legal Profession: How a Lawyer Life Coach Can Help” here. The first part of my short book outlines the causes of too much stress, burnout, anxiety, and depression in the law. The second part provides an overview of how … read more →


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Depression in the News

Getting Some Shut-Eye With Anxiety and Depression

From The New Yorker Magazine, a great set of illustration and wonderfully capture the world of living with depression and anxiety. Read the article.


Yoga Can Help Treat Depression, Studies Show

Medical News Today reports on a series of new studies bring yoga one step closer to becoming a recommended treatment for depression, after finding that the practice can help to reduce symptoms of the condition. Read the article. Read the article.

The Strategies That Science Actually Shows Are Effective for Depression

From Forbes, Alice C. Walton writes, “And as most people who have dealt with depression know, good treatments are hard to come by—but they do exist. Part of the issue is that a given treatment may work for one person and not the other, and it may take several tries before the right therapy, or a combination of therapies, is arrived upon. Here are some of the methods that have been shown to work, and are worth considering. As always, finding a therapist you trust and connect with is often the first step to figuring out which route to take.” Read the rest of her article here.


As Depression , Anxiety and Suicide Skyrocket, the GOP Wants To Gut Our Mental Health Coverage

From The L.A. Times, Melissa Batchelor Warnke writes, “It’s not as if the American public — wary of rising insurance premiums — is demanding reductions in mental health coverage. The silver lining of our preponderance of mental illness is that almost everyone knows someone affected. In this case, familiarity breeds not contempt, but nonpartisan compassion; 77% of Americans believe private health insurance should cover mental health, and 51% believe all types of insurance should cover mental illness.” Read her complete story here.


LWD in the News

Some Law Schools Take The Lead in Students’ Well-Being, Report Finds

The National Task Force on Lawyer Well-Being said in a report released earlier this week that law schools must change their cultures so that everyone—professors, administrators, and students—takes responsibility for student well-being. The report, issued by a coalition of groups including the American Bar Association and the Association of Professional Responsibility Lawyers, stems from a groundbreaking study published last year showing that more than 40 percent of students felt they needed mental-health help and a quarter were at risk for problem drinking. Read the rest of the story here.


‘Better Call Saul’ Highlights Stress and Mental Illness in the Legal Profession

The ABA Journal reports: “Chuck McGill’s suicide in Better Call Saul reflects what is happening within the legal profession throughout the United States. But anxiety and depression are not confined to practicing lawyers. A study of law school students at Yale University found that 70 percent admitted to suffering from some form of mental health issues. Eighty percent of those respondents considered help, but only half of them actually sought it out. Read the article.

 


Am I Depressed Because I’m a Lawyer?

Patrick Krill, a lawyer turned mental health counselor and consultant to law firms about lawyer mental health issues tries to answer the question: “A predicate to all of this, however, is the need to determine if you are actually depressed. Maybe you just hate your job, end of story. Moving on to a different practice or firm could be the change you need.  Or, maybe you have an underlying medical condition that is masquerading as or causing a depressed feeling.”  Read the rest of his blog here.


Big Law Tackles Mental Health Crisis Issues With On-Site Programs; Is Its Business Model at Fault?

The ABA Journal report that Big firms have long been reticent to openly address addiction and other mental-health problems, despite research showing lawyers face higher rates of substance abuse, depression, and suicide than the wider population,” the article says. “Law firm leaders say the need to keep up appearances in a competitive industry has contributed to the resistance. That attitude, however, is slowly changing. Read the article.


The Best of the Blogosphere

How to Stay Positive (Even When You’re Struggling With Depression)

Blogger Ashley Trexler writes, “I wanted her to be a fighter, to always look for the best in others, to fall down and get back up again—and again, and again. I decided to be an optimist not just for myself, but for my child.It’s a struggle to stay positive, and pessimism desperately wants to be BFFs. My negative alter-ego is always sitting on my shoulder, whispering in my ear, “Isn’t life unfair?” Read the rest of her blog here.

 


Depression and Setting Emotional Boundaries

Blogger Liz Smith writes, “Depression can make it difficult to set emotional boundaries with people in your life. Many people I’ve met who suffer from depression, including myself, suffer from difficulties being assertive enough to look after their own emotional well-being but setting emotional boundaries is important in depression. One of the main reasons it’s so hard to be assertive about your emotional limits when you have depression is because of its pervasive effect on your self-worth. On those really awful, down days, the low self-esteem that comes with the depression makes it hard to consider yourself worth looking after physically, let alone emotionally.” Read the rest of her blog.


Drugs Alone Won’t Cure the Epidemic of Depression. We Need a Strategy.

From The Guardian, Mark Rice-Oxley, author of the new memoir, “A Memoir of Depression and Recovery,” says that while antidepressants have saved many lives, they’re not a cure-all.  Here, he gives a short list of some ideas of what might really help. Read his article.


How People With Depression Interact With the World Differently

Depressed people just don’t walk through the world the same way as non-depressed people.  It may or may not be self-evident, but Lindsey Holmes writes specifically about how they behave differently.  Read her blog here.