View More LWD Guest Articles »

Dan's Photo Dan's Latest Blog Entries

Dan’s Roadmap on How to Pass the Bar Exam: The Final Few Days Before the Test

I’m sure the past two months of studying for the Bar Exam have been grueling, if not punishing for you all. Looking out the window at Starbucks while reading a BarBri outline on Contracts as others stroll by in shorts and flip-flops on their way to a summer’s day of fun and frivolity can make you want to scream, “I have had enough of this. Let’s just get it over … read more →


Coping with Summertime Depression: The Light of Gratitude

July’s heat and the sun have made it pretty hot. It’s steamy outside. But that’s just fine with me.  My feet aren’t cold, dark clouds don’t threaten snow, and everyone’s outside watering yards, humming a tune, and going for walks at night. As we look over the horizon, August is almost here. Author Natalie Babbitt captures some of the summer’s magic when she writes: “The first week of August hangs … read more →


My New Book On Depression and Anxiety in the Law and How a Lawyer Life Coach Can Help

I’ve written a new book about depression and anxiety in the legal profession. And it’s free. You can get an immediate, free download of “Overcoming Stress, Burnout, Anxiety, and Depression in the Legal Profession: How a Lawyer Life Coach Can Help” here. The first part of my short book outlines the causes of too much stress, burnout, anxiety, and depression in the law. The second part provides an overview of how … read more →


View More of Dan's Articles »

Depression in the News

The Strategies That Science Actually Shows Are Effective for Depression

From Forbes, Alice C. Walton writes, “And as most people who have dealt with depression know, good treatments are hard to come by—but they do exist. Part of the issue is that a given treatment may work for one person and not the other, and it may take several tries before the right therapy, or a combination of therapies, is arrived upon. Here are some of the methods that have been shown to work, and are worth considering. As always, finding a therapist you trust and connect with is often the first step to figuring out which route to take.” Read the rest of her article here.


As Depression , Anxiety and Suicide Skyrocket, the GOP Wants To Gut Our Mental Health Coverage

From The L.A. Times, Melissa Batchelor Warnke writes, “It’s not as if the American public — wary of rising insurance premiums — is demanding reductions in mental health coverage. The silver lining of our preponderance of mental illness is that almost everyone knows someone affected. In this case, familiarity breeds not contempt, but nonpartisan compassion; 77% of Americans believe private health insurance should cover mental health, and 51% believe all types of insurance should cover mental illness.” Read her complete story here.


Inside the Los Angeles Clinic That Uses Ketamine to Treat Depression

From LA Magazine. Advocates are hailing ketamine therapy and its attendant hallucinations as the ultimate brain hack. Prominent doctors and even the stodgy National Institute of Mental Health have championed the treatment as a powerful weapon in the battle against depression, one that could potentially prevent people from taking their own lives. Read the article.


The Strategies That Science Actually Shows are Effective for Depression

From Forbes magazine. As most people who have dealt with depression know, good treatments are hard to come by—but they do exist. Part of the issue is that a given treatment may work for one person and not the other, and it may take several tries before the right therapy, or a combination of therapies, is arrived upon. Here are some of the methods that have been shown to work, and are worth considering. As always, finding a therapist you trust and connect with is often the first step to figuring out which route to take. Read the article here.


LWD in the News

Am I Depressed Because I’m a Lawyer?

Patrick Krill, a lawyer turned mental health counselor and consultant to law firms about lawyer mental health issues tries to answer the question: “A predicate to all of this, however, is the need to determine if you are actually depressed. Maybe you just hate your job, end of story. Moving on to a different practice or firm could be the change you need.  Or, maybe you have an underlying medical condition that is masquerading as or causing a depressed feeling.”  Read the rest of his blog here.


Big Law Tackles Mental Health Crisis Issues With On-Site Programs; Is Its Business Model at Fault?

The ABA Journal report that Big firms have long been reticent to openly address addiction and other mental-health problems, despite research showing lawyers face higher rates of substance abuse, depression, and suicide than the wider population,” the article says. “Law firm leaders say the need to keep up appearances in a competitive industry has contributed to the resistance. That attitude, however, is slowly changing. Read the article.


6 Tips for Lawyers On Maintaining A Positive Outlook

Whether you’re Biglaw or SmallLaw or government law or stay-at-home-parent law, there are a few things that are important to pay attention to every day. Keeping a positive outlook is one of them. Attorney Garry T. Ross offers up some great ideas on how to do just that.  Read his blog here.


Rethinking Lawyer Motivation

Lawyer and law firm consultant, Paula Davis-Laack writes, “Autonomy, connection to others, and competence are important because they drive motivation and engagement. For those of you focused on the bottom line, it has been shown that engaged employees perform better on a daily basis, and the higher a person’s level of engagement, the higher their objective financial returns.In addition, levels of employee engagement were positively related to business performance in the areas of customer satisfaction and loyalty, profitability, and productivity. That is, higher employee engagement translated into higher customer satisfaction and loyalty, higher profitability, and more productivity. Read her blog.


The Best of the Blogosphere

Drugs Alone Won’t Cure the Epidemic of Depression. We Need a Strategy.

From The Guardian, Mark Rice-Oxley, author of the new memoir, “A Memoir of Depression and Recovery,” says that while antidepressants have saved many lives, they’re not a cure-all.  Here, he gives a short list of some ideas of what might really help. Read his article.


How People With Depression Interact With the World Differently

Depressed people just don’t walk through the world the same way as non-depressed people.  It may or may not be self-evident, but Lindsey Holmes writes specifically about how they behave differently.  Read her blog here.

 


Finding Motivation Even Through the Apathy of Depression

From Esperanza magazine, blogger Margaret Lanning writes, “Lack of motivation is probably the most difficult part of depression I continue to wrestle with. Trying to figure out how to get up and get moving is extremely challenging. It can make or break a day. When I feel apathetic, my senseless thought cycle starts with the notion that I need to choose to do something (clean the kitchen). Then comes immediate resistance (I don’t want to clean the kitchen), then the guilt trip (good mothers clean kitchens so the family can be healthy), then the compromise (I can have a bite of chocolate if I clean the kitchen), then the shut-down (but I still don’t want to clean, and I’ll probably eat the whole chocolate bar), then the self-punishment (I am a bad person because I’m still sitting here).” Read the blog.


10 Summer Depression Busters

Ten percent of those diagnosed with seasonal affective disorder suffer symptoms at the brightest time of the year. The summer’s brutal heat, bright light, and long days can affect a person’s circadian rhythm and contribute to depression for the opposite reasons that winter conditions do. If you’re a Summer Hater, or just notice that your mood is affected negatively by the heat, here are some summer depression busters that may help you better tolerate these months — maybe even enjoy the