The Culture of Depression: Nature, Materialism, and Depression

Dr. Robert J. Hedaya writes, “The physical world we have created and within which the incidence of depression is most rapidly rising is the densely populated Western city. It is made of concrete, steel, glass and asphalt.Most of us do not know, in our bones, the slowly changing rhythms of the forest, through the seasons, and year after year. We can only see time passing in the faces of our loved ones, or the mirror, but we do not experience the naturalness of the passage of time via a changing, slowly morphing landscape around us”. Read his Blog

Volunteer When Depressed? The Life You Save May Be Your Own

Dr. Susan Noonan blogs, “The first thing to know is that when you volunteer  you commit to make yourself available to a person or an organization for a period of time, say 2 or 4 hours per week, on a regular, ongoing basis.  You do it in small steps, not all at once.  You become accountable to others for showing up, on time and ready to function at some moderate level.  They will depend on you for that.  It’s a big step.  This was good for my depression, and I’ll bet yours as well.”  Read the Blog

Depression is a Drag

Psychologist Margeret Wehrenberg writes, “That old expression “What a drag!” Perfectly describes depression: Depression drags on your physical energy. If you have been chronically in a tough situation and getting depressed, your stressed brain wears your body out. Stress is physical, even if you think it is only mental. Your brain generates all the necessary physical preparation to take action, and if you do not take action, you suffer: Tension and aches, exhaustion, sicknesses, and even weight gain.” Read the Blog

Why Is Depression So Tenacious?

Psychologist Jonathan Rottenberg writes, “Why has depression become so prevalent? An ancient mood system has collided with a highly novel operating environment created by a remarkable species. Depression is worse in humans than in other mammals not because our species has more flaws but because of our unique strengths. Advanced language enables wallowing; our ability to set ambitious long-term goals sets up new opportunities for failure; our elaborate culture presents expectations for happiness that cannot possibly be fulfilled.” Read the Blog

Four Questions for a More Resilient Brain

Psychologist Elisha Goldstein writes, “When it comes to overcoming longstanding emotional struggles we have to not only get space from the self-critical mind, but also encourage the positive beliefs about ourselves that the critical mind has buried.”  He lays out four questions that can lead our minds in a more positive direction.  Read his Blog

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